How to Become a Divorce Lawyer: 6 Steps Needed to Practice

How to Become a Divorce Lawyer: The law is a very important part of western civilization. In fact, many experts argue that without the sort of common-law system that we use in the west, our societies would have never been possible and would still be holding witch hunts and requiring the accused to prove their innocence.

The unique sort of blind justice adopted and spread by the west, which requires the state (Crown) to prove a suspect’s guilt, has really paved the way for a lot of things in our societies. It has also paved the way for many different types of law to be practiced. Not everything that goes through the courts is necessarily a criminal case; you will also find a lot of civil cases too.

 This is where family law really comes in. Children needing emancipation, issues of adoption, and of course, the thing for which the genre is most popular: Divorce. This all falls under the banner of family law. So, if you’re one of the many people who decide that you would like to be a divorce lawyer, just know that there’s not really any sort of degree that has “divorce” in its title. What you would need to do is to become an expert on the sort of civil family law genre. Though if you are seriously considering being a lawyer, here are the steps you will have to take.

The 6 Steps Needed to Practice Family Law

Become a Divorce Lawyer
Become a Divorce Lawyer

1: Obtain a Pre-Law Bachelor’s (graduate)

 After you finish your primary education, hopefully with a decent grade-point average, the first step you want to take is to receive some pre-law graduate’s degree. In a nation like Canada, for instance, one will have to work toward a three-year, 90-credit-hour pre-law degree in the “Juris” section. Of course, you will get to shop around and find something that suits your tastes, as there are quite a few options.

2: Learn Law-Adjacent Topics

 Obtaining any sort of degree is about compiling credits. You cannot just have a Juris major and then a bunch of easy-A basket-weaving minors and credits. What you want to get into here are some sociology and psychology courses; you want something that really pads your resume nicely because you will still have to apply for, be accepted into, and fully attend an accredited law school. They’re looking only for people serious about law.

3: Go to an Accredited Law School

 Now, you will have to attend an accredited school of law. This is a no-nonsense environment where all of your courses are going to be law-related. Likely is the case that you’re going to be put on another three-year track to earn your degree. Just remember how important this is, however. There is no way to meet the requirements unless you have a degree from an accredited law school.

4: Meet the Requirements of Your Country/ Province

 Speaking of meeting those requirements, before you go on to your next step, which is going to finalize your journey, you definitely have to ensure that you meet the requirements. So, of course, what you want to do is check with your province, county, etc., to ensure that you’re fulfilling all of the requirements necessary to practice law. You can only be a divorce lawyer if you act in accordance with the law, to begin with.

5: Complete Your Articling and Bar Admission

 Now, the requirements are pretty strict here. You are going to have to complete a year or so of articling, which is basically pre-law, the ability to practice your craft without being officially licensed. This is all to prepare for you for taking the Barrister Licensing Examination and the Solicitor Licensing Examination, known colloquially as the bar exam. Once you pass, you are licensed to practice law.

6: Begin Your Career in Family Law

 Now, you can start your own practice or work with other lawyers and become part of an existing firm. As a licensed lawyer, it will not be hard to get yourself into the door. Earning a job, however, depends on how well you practice family law.

 Thousands of people become lawyers every single year, and all of them walk a pretty long road to get there. If becoming a lawyer is something you’re serious about, then understand that it will take a lot of commitment on your part.

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